Applications for David Saunders Grant now open

SAHANZ annually offers The David Saunders Founder’s Grant in memory of the founder of the Society, to support research by emerging researchers in the disciplines of architectural history and theory. Applications can be made to apply for funds to assist in field-work, archival assistance, printing and reproduction costs in preparation for publication. The award cannot be used to fund conference travel or registration. The Grant amount is AUD $3000. The deadline for 2020 applications is 26 June 2020. Click here for more information and the application form.

SAHANZ-organised session at SAH 2021

Diasporic Architectural Histories

Architectural historiography is challenged by the architecture of migrant communities and migrant individuals. Framing this architecture as nostalgic for the homeland or as aspirational status symbol dehistoricizes the discourse, embedding it in a mythic past and an illusionary future. Equally as often this architecture is not perceived as different to the architecture of its context or its difference is diminished as ornamental aesthetic. Positioning diasporic architecture within ‘sameness’ or ‘similitude’ has resulted in limited examinations. Migration scholars criticise the use of migration and the migrant figure as narrative trope, arguing that a conflation between migration and mobility displaces the historical determination of unprivileged migration. The use of mobility and transnationalism as tropes in twenty-first century architectural historiography can unwittingly erase migration histories.

Pioneering scholars in this field point to the multiple situatedness of migrant architectural production – destination sites, homeland hinterlands, dotted along migration trajectories – as well as processes of procurement and construction. Migration studies complicate the boundaries of agency, normativity, and performativity/desire of the human subject. For example, what does late nineteenth century architectural history look like from the perspective of trans-cultural labour migrations of the first industrial revolution? This session draws on a current momentum of scholarship at the interface of migration/architecture and aims to explore architectural historiographies of the diasporic conditions. 

The session invites investigations including –

  • The potential de-centring/re-centring of what is taken to be architectural culture as spaces are/have been adapted/transformed by changing cultural demographics.
  • How migration and movement of peoples (or movement of ideas/technologies onto peoples in place) leads to re-making/re-imagining/disrupting ideas of national/local spaces and places
  • Borderline spaces and subjectivities caused by conflict, human displacement and material degradation, and the affective and resilient practices by which those affected adapt and recover these spaces for varied forms of occupation and dwelling.

Session Chairs: Mirjana Lozanovska, Deakin University and Anoma Pieris, University of Melbourne

The Society of Architectural Historians is now accepting abstracts for its 74th Annual International Conference in Montréal, Canada, 14–18 April 2021. Read full CFP and instructions to submit your abstract before 3 June 2020 here.

Image courtesy of Tourisme Montréal

Review? Review

2020/2

I’d like to start this month’s newsletter section of ‘Review? Reviewed.’ by thanking all the many SAHANZ Newsletter readers who wrote to me interested in reviewing specific titles and more broadly for Fabrications. Id also like to thank those of you who write suggesting titles. Your ideas are contributing to a terrific list of future books for the journal. Keep an eye out next month!

For those of you who missed the launch of this newsletter section, I am the Book Reviews Editor for Fabrications, the journal of the SAHANZ Community. ‘Review? Reviewed.’ is a new section in the regular SAHANZ Newsletter.

We all enjoy reading book reviews. These short, but valuable critiques are part of the process of peer recognition and academic discourse. Book Reviews can also outline progress in the field, highlighting new areas of research and offer guidance to novice scholars.

In the spirit of great book reviews, each month I will be listing books we currently have available for review. For reviewers, the benefit is a free copy of the book. If you would like to review on of the books below, just send me an email. I will contact the publisher for a free copy of the book. In return, I’ll ask for a thoughtful review of around 1000 words. Due date negotiable.

  • Australia Modern by Hannah Lewi, Philip Goad, 2019.
  • Is the Tehran Bazaar Dead? Foucault, Politics, and Architecture by Farzaneh Haghighi, 2018.
  • Complexity and Contradiction at fifty: Studies toward an Ongoing Debate, edited by Martino Stierli, 2019.
  • The Routledge Handbook on Historic Urban Landscapes in the Asia-Pacific, by Kapila Silva, 2020.
  • Capital Designs: Australia House and Visions of an Imperial London by Eileen Chanin, 2018.

I am also seeking the SAHANZ Community’s suggestions for books you would like to have reviewed in Fabrications. Whether you fancy reviewing it yourself, or just think it should be reviewed, please send me new titles that are key to our field.

I look forward to many emails, till next month,

Cristina

cristina.garduno@unimelb.edu.au

Survey on National Standard of Competency for Architects

The SAHANZ Committee strongly encourages members to participate in the Architects Accreditation Council of Australia (AACA) survey that is currently open, and to voice support for the role of architectural history and heritage as critical aspects of architectural education and professional competency in Australia. The national competency standards (NSCA) could, for instance, recognise the importance of skills in the study of precedents as part of the foundation of design conception. They could also be more explicit in recognising the significance of an understanding of heritage in thinking about design and sustainability.
The survey closes on 27 February 2020Take the survey now.

Review? Reviewed

2020/1

We all enjoy reading book reviews. These short, but valuable critiques are part of the process of peer recognition and academic discourse. Book Reviews can also outline progress in the field, highlighting new areas of research and offer guidance to novice scholars.

So, as the Book Reviews Editor for Fabrications, the journal of the SAHANZ Community I am starting a new section in the regular SAHANZ Newsletter.

In the spirit of great book reviews, each month I will be listing books we currently have available for review. For reviewers, the benefit is a free copy of the book. If you would like to review on of the books below, just send me an email. I will contact the publisher for a free copy of the book. In return, I’ll ask for a thoughtful review of around 1000 words. Due date negotiable.

  • Architecture and Ugliness: Anti-Aesthetics and the Ugly in Postmodern Architecture by edited by Wouter Van Acker and Thomas Mical, 2020
  • Architecture on the Borderline, edited by Anoma Pieris, 2019.
  • Open Architecture: Migration, Citizenship and the Urban Renewal of Berlin-Kreuzberg by IBA 1984/87 by Esra Ackan, 2018.

I am also seeking the SAHANZ Community’s suggestions for books you would like to have reviewed in Fabrications. Whether you fancy reviewing it yourself, or just think it should be reviewed, please send me new titles that are key to our field.

I look forward to many emails, till next month,

Cristina

cristina.garduno@unimelb.edu.au

What if? What next? Speculations on History’s Futures

37th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand

Hosted by the Department of Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design, School of Design, the University of Western Australia and convened by Kate Hislop. Click here for the conference’s website.

Owing to the global COVID-19 pandemic and associated restrictions on gatherings and travel, the SAHANZ 2020 conference dates and format will be amended. The conference will now be held 18 – 25 November 2020. We are keen to hold the conference later this year, given the value in engaging in collective activity of this kind and to ‘mark the moment’ in a special way. The conference theme – Speculations on History’s Futures – is sufficiently flexible and appropriate to be adapted to our proposed changes. Who knew when we devised the theme and title for this Conference that ‘What Next’ would be so apt?

 

Amended Format

We are proposing a conference that will be ‘slow’ and ‘dispersed’. Truly taking advantage of the broad cross-section of the Society’s membership, it will continue to be convened by The University of Western Australia from Perth, but will incorporate a series of localised ‘satellite’ meetings in cities dispersed across Australia and New Zealand. The satellites will accommodate forums for physical and virtual Paper Presentations and Roundtables, clustered in thematic groupings. Conference delegates will be able to attend these forums either in person or by virtual means. Allowing for different time zones, the conference program will be structured to enable delegates to attend presentations and events in virtual mode at each of the satellite locations. To make this viable, the sessions will be spread across at least a week.

 

Regular events

Most of the regular conference events will proceed in accordance with the slow and dispersed format:

  • Opening and Closing events will be scheduled at a time to enable delegates to attend virtually;
  • Keynote speakers will most likely present virtually to a dispersed audience;
  • Tours of WA attractions may still occur for WA delegates and will be made available to all delegates in virtual or recorded form;
  • Proceedings will be published as normal and available early in 2021; and
  • The SAHANZ AGM will be scheduled at a time during or at the close of the conference. Society members will be invited to attend virtually.

Abstract amendments

While there is no expectation that abstracts be amended, we recognise that some proposers may wish to revise or reframe (or withdraw) abstracts based on the changes outlined above, or as a result of limited access to sources as a result of COVID-19 restrictions. Revised abstracts will be accepted until 18 May 2020.

Please submit revised abstracts via sahanz2020-sdes@uwa.edu.au as per the original submission details on the website https://www.sahanz2020.com/formats.

 

Amended dates

Owing to the interruption of and delays incurred by the pandemic, all key dates for the conference will be extended. Taking into account the likely return to physical gatherings, though with probable ongoing restriction in travel, the conference will now be held 18-25 November 2020.

  • Revised abstracts will be accepted until 18 May 2020
  • Notification of acceptance of abstracts will be emailed to proposers by 31 May 2020
  • Full papers will be due for review by 28 August 2020

 

Key dates will be found updated on the Conference website.

Registration details will be available on the Conference website towards mid-year.

 

THEME

Challenges to the transmission of historical knowledge in architectural education today highlight a potential shift in expertise that may ultimately impact upon the production of architecture, as well as broader understanding of the built environment, which warrants interrogating. At the same time, increasing appetite for the preservation and repurposing of built fabric feeds a growing heritage sector (and associated tourism industry) that offers opportunity for architectural history’s contribution insofar as its basis in inquiry informs knowledge, interpretation and evaluation of buildings and places. The 2020 SAHANZ Conference calls for broad consideration of the prospects for architectural history in relation to the endurance and/or transformation of architecture as a discipline and profession.

 

Under the banner of ‘history’s futures’ we encourage speculation upon impending modes of application of critical scholarship and historical knowledge: what might be the nature, purpose or outcomes of historical inquiry? What might be the intersections with or influences upon architectural production? Upon the reception of architecture? Or what kinds of projections about the future can be discovered in the past? Questions around pedagogy, transmission, content and method all bring focus upon architectural history’s role to investigate and locate architecture within the contexts, frameworks and processes informing its production and use.

 

Across the breadth of cultural, environmental and material concerns we invite examination of the intersections of architectural history with heritage scholarship and practice. Complex relationships exist between history and heritage, and also memory and narrative, with regard to notions of identity and authenticity as they are bound up with the past, present and future. This is nowhere more evident than in the context of global phenomena such as Brexit, or by contrast in the powerful Uluru Statement from the Heart. David Lowenthal’s declaration that history may be usurped by memory and nostalgia because of the personal dimension and immediacy that they bring to matters of the past highlights an opportunity for architectural history. Buildings, landscapes and the artefacts associated with them provide tangible material historical record through which stories are found and told. Moreover, history has benefitted from the myriad more ways of accessing, understanding and disseminating knowledge of past times, places, artefacts and cultures.

 

We pose the counterfactual ‘what if’ questions about how architectural histories – of the past or in future – might sound or look if recast from marginal points of view (indigenous, migrant, gender, class and so on); or if editorial choices responded to different criteria (what to include and what to leave out). Conjecturing ‘what if’ through a hypothetical recasting or negating of an event enables appraisal of its relative historical and future importance. In turn, we ask, might the ‘what if’ or ‘what next’ questions equip architectural history with additional evaluative tools to support its (future) disciplinary inquiry?

 

We have invited original papers by individual or joint authors and/or Round Table sessions considering or expanding upon topics such as:

+ Modes of architectural history

Ecologies of history: histories of ecology

Architectural history through technology and material culture

Architectural history in the digital, virtual and gaming age/space

+ Routes to the Past

Critical, cultural or commercial: intersections between architectural history and heritage

Authentic? History, heritage and matters of veracity and experience

Legacy: presenting the value of the past through constructed and cultural landscapes

Pedagogy, policy and practice: education, governance and the institutions of history and/or heritage

+ Countering the canon/s

Living cultures: recovering Indigenous narratives in architectural history

Activism and agency in architectural history: migrancy, gender diversity, class

Advocacy through heritage: promoting built environment quality, conservation and sustainability

+ The counterfactual

What if? What next? So what? Exploring the historical consequences of choices

Feedback loops: architectural history’s impact on architecture

 

Authors may only present one paper as a sole author, although they may present one additional paper as a co-author. All papers presented are to be accompanied by a conference registration.

Work submitted for review and publication in the Conference Proceedings should be original research that has not been previously published elsewhere, or work that has undergone substantial development from a prior publication.

 

ACADEMIC COMMITTEE

Kate Hislop (UWA, Convener)

Philip Goldswain (UWA)

Hannah Lewi (U.Melb)

Sarah McGann (Notre Dame, WA)

Bill Taylor (UWA)

John Ting (UC)

Peter Scriver (U.Adelaide)

Lee Stickells (U.Syd)

Nicole Sully (UQ)

Christopher Vernon (UWA)

Nigel Westbrook (UWA)

 

For further information about the conference please email: sahanz2020-sdes@uwa.edu.au

 

Image courtesy of Hannah Lewi

SAHANZ Call for SAH 2021 Session Proposals

The SAHANZ Committee calls for session proposals for the 2021 Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) Annual International Conference to be held in Montréal, Québec, 14-18 April.

As part of our partnership agreement with SAH, SAHANZ is able to put forward a session proposal for the 2021 conference. We invite submissions from interested SAHANZ members for consideration by the SAHANZ Committee. Submissions should be based on topics of mutual interest between SAHANZ and SAH.

This offer does not preclude members making their own direct submissions but is intended to take advantage of the opportunity provided by our partnership

Session proposals (of no more than 500 words, titles of no more than 65 characters including spaces and punctuation) should be sent by 2 December 2019 to the SAHANZ Secretary (secretary@sahanz.net) .

For more information, please consult the SAH 2021 conference website.

Image courtesy of Tourisme Montréal

Call for Proposals: Guest-Edited, Special Issue of Fabrications

Fabrications is the refereed journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ). Established in 1989, it is devoted to scholarly publication in the field of architectural history. The journal’s contents reflect the wide interests of the Society’s diverse membership. It publishes papers on a wide range of themes, but especially on the architectural, urban and landscape history of Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific and South-East Asia. The journal is published for the Society by Taylor & Francis, with each annual volume containing three issues. Special issues may be referred to the publisher’s Special Issues as Books programme following publication.

The Society invites proposals for a special, guest-edited issue of its journal, Fabrications, to be published in January 2021 (volume 31, no. 1). The guest editor(s) will work to realise the special issue in collaboration with the journal’s appointed editors, Mirjana Lozanovska and Cameron Logan, and in consultation with the Society’s Editorial Board.

For further information on Fabrications and to review past issues, see the Taylor and Francis website.

Timelines for the issue will be as follows:

  • Invitation to edit the special issue – November 2019
  • Call for papers advertised –  January 2020
  • Papers due – 1st  June 2020
  • Reviews concluded – 10th August 2020
  • Guest Editors to hand over final papers for editing and production – 10th September 2020

Proposals should include:

  • Theme title and editor(s)
  • Brief CV of the editor(s)
  • Draft call for papers (maximum 400 words)
  • If relevant, information about any event around which the proposal may be organised
  • If relevant, the names and/or themes of any specific contributions the editor(s) anticipate(s) including in the issue

Deadline for submissions is 10th December 2019. Proposals will be considered by the SAHANZ Editorial Board.

Please direct submissions and enquiries to Paul Walker, walkp@unimelb.edu.au.