Para-colonial – Colonial – Post-colonial: Influences and Transactions in the Architecture of Oceania

'Raising the Union Jack in Apia', URL: https://nzhistory.govt.nz/media/photo/raising-union-jack-apia, (Ministry for Culture and Heritage), updated 2-Sep-2014

Call for Papers:

Para-colonial – Colonial – Post-colonial: Influences and Transactions in the Architecture of Oceania (1840–1990)

Joint symposium convened by Christoph Schnoor (Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand) and Michael Falser (Technical University, Munich, Germany) 

The beginning of global contact with the South Pacific is often automatically associated with the first explorative travels of James Cook in the 18th century. However, it was the late 19th century which culminated in a complex process of multinational developments, backwards and forwards, battles even. Imperialist interests already dated back many centuries, but in realising the trading potentials in this part of the world, the major colonising powers – such as Great Britain, France, USA, the German Reich and others – occupied and took ‘possession’ of island countries in the Pacific during the latter part of the 19th century. This development reached its first peak around and after 1900. However, before this direct colonial impact, trading firms and missionaries had already caused a first – ‘para-colonial’ – wave (indirect, not yet official colonial), introducing and implementing foreign concepts and customs. This dynamic process of constant negotiations and change of power continued well into the first half of the 20th century: in the context and aftermath of the First World War, countries neighbouring the Pacific from the west, east and south – like the USA and Japan to Australia and New Zealand – took over Mandated Territories from collapsing German colonies in the region, but at the same time acted themselves as de-facto colonisers in the concerned island countries from the Marianne Islands to Papua-New Guinea all the way to Samoa. Today, the impact of these 100 years of para-colonial, colonial and postcolonial experiences of more than a century is still widely felt. The recent apology for the dawn raids of the 1970s offered by New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern reflects this.

Knowledge on colonial architecture in the South Pacific is still sparse. Connections with pre- colonial settings and the post-colonial afterlife of this built legacy are often missing. In this sense, this call for papers particularly welcomes contributions within the targeted time span c. 1840– 1990, embedded in the larger South Pacific region. These contributions would attempt to link their concrete architectural case studies of buildings, ensembles and urbanist projects with reflections on the influences of and transactions between locals and foreigners, colonials and colonised, and their changing allegiances, even across changing political powers.

Contributions to the symposium will be published in form of conference proceedings or as a peer-reviewed themed volume.

Additional information can be found in the full call for papers, which can be downloaded below.

Please submit your abstracts no later than 10 January 2022 via email to conference email: colonialoceania.ltg@ed.tum.de

CFP_Architecture of Oceania (1840-1990),  Auckland-NZ  29 June – 1 July 2022

2021 AGM

The Annual General Meeting of the Society will take place on Saturday 13th of November 2021, 3:30-5:30 pm ACDT (Adelaide) online via Zoom, as part of the 38th Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) hosted by The University of Adelaide, School of Architecture and Built Environment.

The agenda and documentation for the AGM can be found HERE.

If you are planning to attend the AGM, please ensure that your membership is current. Click HERE for membership registration or EMAIL the Secretary for information.

Survey to Map Female Voices

Prof. Jua Cilliers and Gill Armstrong are undertaking a research project to map female voices in built environment research. They have a short 5-question survey, which they have asked to have forwarded to they membership of SAHANZ, as they would like to include voices in the architectural history space. Heritage and understanding place is very dear to both, and they are eager to have representation from the many researchers who self-identify as female in architectural history.

If this project interests you, please get in contact with Gill at Gillian.armstrong@uts.edu.au, and she can send you a 1-page outline for further information.

2021 David Saunders Founder’s Grant

The 2021 David Saunders Founder’s Grant has been awarded to Jasper Ludewig for his project ‘Mapping the Global Moravian Network, 1720-1920’.

Jasper is a Lecturer in Architecture at the University of Newcastle, NSW.

‘Mapping the Global Moravian Network, 1720-1920’ uses digital humanities techniques to visualise and analyse the global history of the modern Moravian movement. Whether in Jamaica, Greenland, South Africa, Victoria or Far North Queensland, the Moravians constructed a similar environment everywhere. Although architecture played a fundamental role within the Moravians’ global corporate geography, the nature and consistency of its application remain almost entirely overlooked by historians of architecture. This project, therefore, seeks to account for over three hundred Moravian settlements established on every continent except for Antarctica from the early eighteenth- to the twentieth centuries. It will produce a freely available online database using software designed by the Time Layered Cultural Map project at the University of Newcastle. The final ‘publication’ will consist of an interactive database of settlements, connecting a public audience to digitised archival material from numerous institutions, as well as a series of accessible thematic essays that analyse the place of architecture within the long and global history of the Moravian network.

Image: Moravian settlements from around the world, 1720-1920, Moravian Archives Herrnhut

Fabrications Reviews Editor

Isabel Rousset has joined the Fabrications team as Reviews Editor. Isabel is an architectural historian specializing in German modernism. Her research on this topic has appeared in the Journal of Architecture, the Journal of Urban History, and Architectural Theory Review. Having previously held funded research positions at the Technical University of Berlin and the University of Sydney, Isabel is currently teaching architectural history at Curtin University.

The Reviews Editor will solicit and edit reviews of books, exhibitions and other works. If you are interested in reviewing a specific title for the journal, please email: isabel.rousset@curtin.edu.au

Fabrications: JSAHANZ is published in three issues each year by Taylor & Francis.

Fabrications Co-Editor

The Editorial Board of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand calls for Expressions of Interest for the role of Co-Editor of the Society’s refereed journal, Fabrications: JSAHANZ, published in three issues each year.

Read more 

Fabrications Guest Editor Issue 32.1 (2022)

The Society invites proposals for a special, guest-edited issue of its journal, Fabrications, to be published in January 2022 (volume 32, no. 1). The guest editor(s) will work to realise the special issue in collaboration with the journal’s appointed editors, Mirjana Lozanovska and Cameron Logan, and in consultation with the Society’s Editorial Board. Read more.

Fabrications Reviews Editor

The Editorial Board of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand calls for Expressions of Interest for the ongoing role of Reviews Editor of the Society’s refereed journal, Fabrications: JSAHANZ published in three issues each year by Taylor & Francis. Read more

The Editorial Board of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand calls for Expressions of Interest for the ongoing role of Reviews Editor of the Society’s refereed journal, Fabrications: JSAHANZ published in three issues each year by Taylor & Francis. Read more.